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Welcome to JT Mobility Pvt. Ltd.

India’s first manufacturer of electric vehicle portable chargers and components

Frequently Asked Questions

Type of Plugs for Electrical Vehicle

Type 1 plug

The type 1 plug is a single-phase plug which allows for charging power levels of up to 7.4 kW (230 V, 32 A). The standard is mainly used in car models from the Asian region, and is rare in Europe, which is why there are very few public type 1 charging stations.

Type 2 plug

The triple-phase plug’s main area of distribution in Europe. In private spaces, charging power levels of up to 22 kW are common, while charging power levels of up to 43 kW (400 V, 63 A, AC) can be used at public charging stations. Most public charging stations are equipped with a type 2 socket. All mode 3 charging cables can be used with this, and electric cars can be charged with both type 1 and type 2 plugs.


Combined Charging System, or CCS

The CCS plug is an enhanced version of the type 2 plug, with two additional power contacts for the purposes of quick charging and supports AC and DC charging power levels (alternating and direct current charging power levels) of up to 2000 kW. In practice, the value is usually around 150 kW.


Tesla Supercharger

For its supercharger, Tesla uses a modified version of the type 2 Mennekes plug. This allows for the Model S to recharge to 80% within 30 minutes. Tesla offers charging to its customers for free. To date it has not been possible for other makes of car to be charged with Tesla superchargers.


International Charging Plug Guide


Electric Vehicle Charging Mode Guide


EV Charging Mode 1

With this mode, the EV is directly connected to a household socket. The maximum current of this mode is 16A and its voltage should not exceed 250 V with a single-phase system and 480 V in the case of a three-phase network.

Mode 1 is the simplest possible charging mode and does not support any communication between the EV and the charge point. This charging mode is prohibited or restricted in many countries.


EV Charging Mode 2

Household socket-outlets do not always provide electric power according to the actual standards. Besides, socket-outlets and plugs designed for household applications might not be able to tolerate continuous current draw at the maximum rated value.

That’s why connecting an EV to the socket-outlet for a long time with no control and safety functions can increase the risk of electric shock. To solve this problem, specialists developed charging mode 2 that uses a special type of charging cable equipped with an in-cable control and protection device (IC-CPD). The IC-CPD performs the required control and safety functions. The maximum current of this mode is 32 A and its maximum voltage should not exceed 250 V single-phase or 480 V three-phase. Mode 2 can be used with both household and industrial sockets.


EV Charging Mode 3

This mode utilizes a dedicated EVSE along with the EV on-board charger. The AC current from the charging station is applied to the on-board circuitry to charge the battery. Several control and protection functions are employed to guarantee public safety. These include verifying the protective earth connection and the connection between the EVSE and the EV.

Moreover, this mode can adjust the charging current to the maximum current capability of the cable assembly. The maximum current of this charging mode is 250 A with either a 250 V 1-phase or 480 V 3-phase network.


EV Charging Mode 4

This is the only charging mode that incorporates an off-board charger with a DC output. The DC current is delivered directly to the battery and the on-board charger is bypassed. This mode can provide 600 V DC with a maximum current of 400 A. The high-power level involved in this mode mandates a higher level of communication and stricter safety features.

Mode 4 only allows a case C connection, where the charging cable is permanently connected to the charging station.

Certifications and Standards for EV

Certifications and Standards for EV

With traditional and new entrants using a variety of technology approaches towards electric vehicles, it is critical that standards are established to ensure that EV technologies are reliable. Malfunctions in the electronics in the automobile and the charging infrastructure could have fatal consequences for occupants and other persons involved along with rescue teams. Safe operation and reliability of batteries, controls, plug connectors, switches, and wires need to be assured for peace of mind and accident avoidance. Regulatory frameworks that establish benchmarks for various EV component technologies and offer a certification process for providers will increase consumer confidence, safety, and supplier compliance. The key benefits of establishing global standards and certifications include:

·      Safety of personnel, product, and charging infrastructure

·      Interoperability so a common infrastructure can be utilized

·      Cost reduction to ensure mass production and accessibility of EV technology

·      Increased adoption of new technologies underpinning the EV revolution

Several standards are published at the global level by the International Electrotechnical Commission (IEC) and the International Organization for Standardization (ISO) and transposed in supra-national and national versions. The ensuing sections of this article delineate the standards and the areas where these standards are most applicable.


Regulations and Certification for Electric Vehicles

The recognition that climate change is a real threat to the sustainable continuation of our lifestyle, has driven an explosion in alternatives to fossil fuel-based transportation. From the early 2000s, the emergence of electric-gas hybrid and fully electric vehicles (EV) has accelerated dramatically.

Advances in battery technologies and machine learning have created new excitement for electric vehicles and most traditional car manufacturers have electric vehicle lines coming to market. In addition to sustainability objectives, higher emissions standards, falling EV technology prices, increases in battery energy densities and more widespread charging infrastructure are all making EV vehicles the future of transportation.

 

Overview of the Main International Standards Related to Electric Mobility

Currently, there is no single global EV standard. Many of the major EV production centers – including Japan, Europe, North America, and China – are promoting differing ideas in a variety of areas. Although regulatory certifications usually follow technological innovation they serve as an important rite of passage to access the EV marketplace. By stipulating basic guidelines for safety and environmental compliance, regulatory standards impact the evolution of the technology. For EV vehicular technologies, four main areas constitute the bulk of the regulatory and standard setting efforts:

·      •  Safety and security

·      •  Charging connectors

·      •  Charging topology

·      •  EV charging related communications

 



Figure 1: Overview of key EV standards



Safety and Security

EVs require rigorous safety testing. The same safety standards required for conventional vehicles also apply to EVs. The safety standard covers a wide range of specific details pertaining to information management, privacy, installation, occupant injury prevention, and insulation against electric shock. The safety issues of EVs are largely covered by the international standard ISO 6469. This standard has three parts:

·      •  On-board electrical energy storage, i.e., the battery

·      •  Functional safety means protection against failures

·      •  Protection of persons against electrical hazards

The table below describes the safety and security standards outside of ISO 6469.

 

 Standard Name

 Description

 ISO/IEC 27000

 Provides best practice recommendations on information security management including privacy, confidentiality, and IT/technical/cybersecurity issues

 IEC 60364-7-722

 Low-voltage electrical installations - Part 7-722: Requirements for special installations or locations - Supplies for electric vehicles

 SAE J1766

 Ensures adequate barriers between occupants and battery systems to protect from potentially harmful factors and materials within the battery system that can injure occupants of the vehicle during a crash

 ISO 17409

 Safety requirements for conductive connection of EVs to external electric circuits

 IEC 61140

 Protection against electric shock. Common aspects for installation and equipment

 IEC 62040

 Uninterruptible power systems (UPS)

 IEC 60529

 Degrees of protection provided by enclosures (IP Code)



Connectors

The EV charging connector or plug type standard varies across geographies and models. While there is no consensus on a universal plug technology, there is a critical mass of global automakers supporting the Combined Charging System (CCS) in North America and Europe. Japanese automakers use CHArge de MOve (CHAdeMO), and China – the world’s largest electric vehicle market uses GB/T. All the standards intend to define a common electric vehicle conductive charging system architecture including operational requirements and the functional and dimensional requirements for the vehicle inlet and mating connector.

In North America, SAE J1772 (IEC 62196 Type 1), also known as a J plug, is the standard for electrical connectors for electric vehicles. Maintained by the SAE International and formally titled "SAE Surface Vehicle Recommended Practice J1772, SAE Electric Vehicle Conductive Charge Coupler", it covers the general physical, electrical, communication protocol, and performance requirements for the electric vehicle conductive charge system and coupler.


 

Communication

Today, very few charging stations (both at home and public) are smart grid-enabled, and even fewer cars allow for V2G (vehicle to grid) connectivity. However, rising EV penetration is likely to increase the need for common standards for charging infrastructure and interoperability between charging stations, distribution networks, and the EVs themselves. Interoperability is key not only to shield from charging infrastructure vendor lock-in but also to allow for cost-effective connectivity of EVs with diverse charging infrastructure and metering.

ISO15118 – an international standard for bi-directional digital communications between electric vehicles and the charging station – defines a V2G communication interface for bi-directional charging/discharging of electric vehicles. ISO15118 is a key enabler of the “plug & charge” capability, allowing EV drivers to insert the charger plug into the car, charge, and drive away when ready. This process is enabled by a digital certificate in the vehicle, allowing it to communicate with the charging point management system (CPMS). This enables a seamless end-to-end charging process, which includes automatic authentication and billing, and avoids the need to use an RFID card, an app, or to memorize PINs.

Here is the list of common standards on EV communication:

 

 Standard Name

 Description

 ISO/IEC 15118

 Communication interface for bi-directional charging/discharging of electric vehicle

 SAE J2847

 Communication between plug-in vehicles and off-board DC chargers

 IEC 61851-24

 Electric vehicle conductive charging system - Part 24: Digital communication between
 a DC EV charging station and an electric vehicle for control of DC charging

 SAE J2931

 Security requirements for digital communication between the Electric Vehicle Supply Equipment (EVSE) and the utility, ESI, Advanced Metering Infrastructure (AMI), and/or  Home Area Network (HAN)

 IEC 61850

 Communication networks and systems for power utility automation - ALL PARTS



EV Charging

The IEC 61851 standard pertains to electric vehicle conductive charging systems. The standard describes four charging modes. The first three modes deliver AC current to the EV on-board charger; however, mode 4 delivers DC current directly to the battery and bypasses the on-board charger. Mode 3 employs several control and protection functions with the goal of public safety.



 EV Charging

 Description

 Mode 1

 Charging with AC on a typical household wall outlet, either 1 or 3 phase, with currents up to 16A. In this mode, there is no communication between the energy source/grid
 and the vehicle. Ground fault interrupter (GFI)/residual current detector (RCD) should be installed on the infrastructure side

 Mode 2

 Like mode 1, with higher currents and a control and protection equipment integrated into the in-cable control and protection device (IC-CPD). The IC-CPD protects from electrical hazards in case of isolation failures

 Mode 3

 Charging with AC takes place through a dedicated charging outlet connected to a stationary charger. Charging is controlled via communication between the charging unit and the vehicle

 Mode 4

 Charging with DC is useful when charging with a high amount of power. In IEC mode 4 there is a dedicated with a fixed charging cable and a dedicated DC charging  plug



Summary

Electric vehicle proliferation will be widespread as the world grapples with climate change and environmental sustainability. Cost reduction, technological advances, and multiple suppliers are all driving dramatic innovations in EV technology. Global standards can further speed up the adoption of EV technology and increase the safety compliance of EVs. Just as with traditional automobiles, safety and reliability are the key thrusts of the various standards in use across the globe. Vehicle and charging infrastructure safety and security, connectors, charging topology, and EV communications are the main areas covered by today's standards. Despite the prevalence of different standards, there is a critical mass in various geographies to drive a harmonious adoption of EV standards across the globe.

 

Charging System and Cables Testing & Certification

Why Testing is Important:

Manufacturers and operators of Electrical Vehicle (EV) charging systems and components i.e EV Charging Cable, Plugs, Socket-Outlet Connectors must maintain high standards in a competitive market. Indeed, a reliable charging system backed up by an internationally recognized certificate of safety and performance is both a key selling point and an essential step in proving compliance.

Reason for compliance – The charging station for electric vehicles (EV) is a complex system comprising an energy management system, smart grid communication, and billing system. Compliance with safety and quality requirements ensures the safety of its usage by the public while minimizing potential financial loss for charging system operators. Compliance with safety requirements helps to export products and thereby expands market access.


The Electric Vehicle industry is at a nascent stage in India. At present, Government schemes and subsidies are playing a major role in driving demand and fuelling growth in this market. Additionally, increasing environmental concerns, especially regarding high pollution levels in large cities, are changing consumer mind-sets and thereby fuelling positive market growth. There are several serious players in this industry today who are collectively trying to bring about a positive change under the banner of the Society of Manufacturers of Electric Vehicles (SMEV).

 

Benefits of Electric Vehicles and Market Potential:

One of India’s major development goals is the urgent need to reduce carbon emissions, increase energy security, improve fuel economy, and lower fuel costs. The wire and cable industry now has new opportunities to expand, thanks to the rapid development of the EV industry.

According to a recent market research report, the global EV charging cables market is projected to grow at a CAGR of 31.8%, to reach USD 1,808 million by 2027 from an estimated USD 598 million in 2021. Factors such as increasing the adoption of electric vehicles, the rapid development of electric vehicle supply equipment, and increasing demand for fast charging cables would drive this growth.

  

Applicable Tests for EV Charging Cables  


FAQ For Buyers

Q1. What is your terms of EVSE packing?

A: Generally, we pack our goods in neutral white boxes and brown cartons. If you have legally registered patent, we can pack the goods in your branded boxes after getting your authorization letters.

Q2. What is your terms of payment?

A: T/T 50% as deposit, and 50% before delivery. We’ll show you the photos of the products and packages before you pay the balance.

Q3. What is your terms of delivery?

A: FOB, CFR, CIF, Ex-Work.

Q4. How about your delivery time?

A: Generally, it will take 3 to 25 days after receiving your advance payment. The specific delivery time depends on the items and the quantity of your order.

Q5. Can you produce according to the samples?

A: Yes, we can produce by your samples or technical drawings. We can build the molds and fixtures.

Q6. What is your sample policy?

A: We can supply the sample if we have ready parts in stock, but the customers must pay the sample cost and the courier cost.

Q7. Do you test all your goods before delivery?

A: Yes, we have 100% test before delivery

Q8: How do you make our business long-term and good relationship?

A:  1. We keep good quality and competitive price to ensure our customers benefit ;

     2. We respect every customer as our friend and we sincerely do business and make friends with them, no matter where they come from.

Q9: How much warranty of the product?

A: The warranty of all our products is one year. The specific after-sale plan will be free for replacement or charging a certain maintenance cost according to the specific situations.

Q10: Do you make ODM?

A: We provide flexible customized services include ODM includes length, logo, packaging etc.

What is Repair and Return Policy ?

Return Requirement

All unused product must be in the original packaging, with the return authorization number (RMA#) clearly printed on the outside of the package, or it will be returned. Return requests must be made within 7 days of our invoice date.


Return for Credit Procedure

All returns for credit require an RMA# and original purchase order number. RMA numbers are valid for 7 days, and product must be received at JT Mobility support center within this 7-day period. After 7 days the RMA# becomes void, and any equipment received after that original 7 days will be returned to the customer at their expense.

Product returns without an authorized RMA# listed on the outside of the carton will not be accepted and returned to the customer at their expense.

All returns will be credited to customer’s account minus any applicable shipping charges and restocking fee.

Repair Procedure

1. All requests for the return of product for repair are directed to the JT Mobility Tech Support Department for authorization.

2. Advanced Replacements: Requests for advance replacement of an existing product must be authorized by a JT Mobility Tech Support team, after determining that there     is a problem with the product.

3. All product returns require a RMA number, which must appear on the outside of the carton, or shipment will not be accepted and returned to the customer at their     expense.

4. All returns require a packing list noting the following information:

    Product model number

    Details of defect or malfunction

    Ship to address

    Contact person and phone number

5. All product returns must ship freight prepaid to JT Mobility. Collect shipments will not be accepted unless authorized in advance.

6. Products found to have no defects or non-related to factory defects will be returned.

7. Return of shipment will be freight prepaid by JT Mobility direct to the sender by the same method as the product was received.

8. If advance replacement was authorized, upon receipt of replaced product, the customer shall return the defective unit within one week under the same RMA number     to close out the RMA.

9. Advanced Replacements with a current RMA will be invoiced at the standard price. When the defective product is returned, it will be tested and evaluated. A credit will     be issued against the Advanced Replacement invoice depending upon the evaluation of the returned item.

10. All RMA numbers remain valid up to 30 days from date of issue.

Safety Note

  • Ensure your charge cable is protected against water and damp to ensure the long life of your cable.
  • Ensure that your charging cable is not twisted or excessively tightly bent during cable storage.
  • Always store the cable in a dry, clean place. Plug to plug cables should be removed from the charge unit when not in use. This will also protect the charge unit from damp and dust.
  • Dust caps should always be replaced when cable is not in use.
  • It is advisable to periodically clean the plug pins with a dry, clean cloth. This will remove any damp or dust particles which will cause damage.
  • DO NOT drive over your cable or plugs or continually drop the plugs.

Certifications and Standards for EV

Certifications and Standards for EV

With traditional and new entrants using a variety of technology approaches towards electric vehicles, it is critical that standards are established to ensure that EV technologies are reliable. Malfunctions in the electronics in the automobile and the charging infrastructure could have fatal consequences for occupants and other persons involved along with rescue teams. Safe operation and reliability of batteries, controls, plug connectors, switches, and wires need to be assured for peace of mind and accident avoidance. Regulatory frameworks that establish benchmarks for various EV component technologies and offer a certification process for providers will increase consumer confidence, safety, and supplier compliance. The key benefits of establishing global standards and certifications include:

·      Safety of personnel, product, and charging infrastructure

·      Interoperability so a common infrastructure can be utilized

·      Cost reduction to ensure mass production and accessibility of EV technology

·      Increased adoption of new technologies underpinning the EV revolution

Several standards are published at the global level by the International Electrotechnical Commission (IEC) and the International Organization for Standardization (ISO) and transposed in supra-national and national versions. The ensuing sections of this article delineate the standards and the areas where these standards are most applicable.


Regulations and Certification for Electric Vehicles

The recognition that climate change is a real threat to the sustainable continuation of our lifestyle, has driven an explosion in alternatives to fossil fuel-based transportation. From the early 2000s, the emergence of electric-gas hybrid and fully electric vehicles (EV) has accelerated dramatically.

Advances in battery technologies and machine learning have created new excitement for electric vehicles and most traditional car manufacturers have electric vehicle lines coming to market. In addition to sustainability objectives, higher emissions standards, falling EV technology prices, increases in battery energy densities and more widespread charging infrastructure are all making EV vehicles the future of transportation.

 

Overview of the Main International Standards Related to Electric Mobility

Currently, there is no single global EV standard. Many of the major EV production centers – including Japan, Europe, North America, and China – are promoting differing ideas in a variety of areas. Although regulatory certifications usually follow technological innovation they serve as an important rite of passage to access the EV marketplace. By stipulating basic guidelines for safety and environmental compliance, regulatory standards impact the evolution of the technology. For EV vehicular technologies, four main areas constitute the bulk of the regulatory and standard setting efforts:

·      •  Safety and security

·      •  Charging connectors

·      •  Charging topology

·      •  EV charging related communications